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UFC FUEL TV Results

Fri May 25, 2012 3:08 pm by Anonymous

UFC FUEL TV Results


Fighters
Str
TD
Sub
Pass
Method
Rnd
Time
Replay
WINChan Sung Jung
Dustin Poirier
74
56
4
0
3
0
3
1
R4
Submission 4 of 5 00:01:07 --
WINAmir Sadollah
Jorge Lopez
36
32
1
4
1
0
0
2
R3
Decision - Split 3 of 3 00:05:00 --
WINDonald Cerrone
Jeremy Stephens
87
46
1
0
0
0
0


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As a woman...about the UFC who i want to win

Fri May 25, 2012 3:18 pm by Anonymous

[b]As a woman...about the UFC who i want to win

Stefan-Struve OMG he is sooo cute....yes my female hormones pick the fighter!!


Skill Breakdown
Charts are compiled based on results from all fights.
Total Fights: 11
Record: 27-5-0
Summary: kickboxing and submissions
Fighter Info
Nickname: Skyscraper


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Short history of the UFC

Fri May 25, 2012 2:57 pm by Anonymous

What is MMA and the UFC?

Originating from the full contact sport of Vale tudo in Brazil, the UFC was created in the United States in 1993 with minimal rules, and was promoted as a competition to determine the most effective marital art for unarmed combat situations.

It wasn't long before the …


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Psychological Games

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Psychological Games

Post by cool66616 on Sat Aug 28, 2010 4:41 am

Despite the promising name, psychological games are really no fun at all. They are unconscious, repetitive behavior patterns between two people (sometimes more), which will leave both of them feeling depleted and unhappy.

In transactional analysis we have quite specific patterns in mind when we talk about psychological games, or just games for short. One way of defining a game is as a set of matching interactions by two or more people where there is a hidden agenda at work and at some point a switch of roles between the participants. A game ends in a predictable way and may be played over and over again.

Generally speaking, there are only 3 roles from which one can participate in a game: Rescuer, Persecutor and Victim. To show that these are roles we spell them with capital letters, to distinguish them from "real-life" rescuers such as an ambulance crew. While they rescue people, they may not be doing so from a psychological role of "rescuing". If you find this terminology odd or even inappropriate, well, it's fairly old and Eric Berne's language was simply never updated. Hope that counts as an apology.


So, we have three psychological roles, and once you take any one of them, you set yourself up to participate in a game. (As you'll see, though, it's best never to get into any of them!) People will have their favorite game position, which they start off from. Often our favorite position is something we have learned as a child. All three positions are inauthentic and dismiss some aspects about oneself or someone else (e.g. as a Rescuer I dismiss other people's capacity to think and act on their own behalf).

The Rescuer is a person who comes in with the overt agenda of doing things for other people or sorting them out in some way. The hidden belief is that other people are not capable of doing stuff for themselves, which puts the Rescuer in a "one-up" position. However, the hidden assumption is often unconscious and a lot of Rescuers are well-meaning. Even so, classic Rescuers go in to help people without asking, doing more than their fair share, and ending up doing things they don't want to do.

The Victim is a person who asks other people to sort things out for him or her rather than doing it him- or herself: in other words, operating from a "one-down" position. Victims may put themselves down and disown their capacity to think and act for themselves. They may not use their own Adult capacity to think and may believe that "I cannot cope on my own". The Victim may portray him- or herself as powerless, and often feels powerless on the inside; however, even though Victims disown their own power, they have the power to initiate the switch of roles within a game (which gives them a lot of power in relationships).

Lastly, the Persecutor. He or she dismisses the capacity of others to think, feel or act on their own behalf. The Persecutor has a hidden agenda of punishing or belittling people in some way. Like the Rescuer, he or she comes from a one-up position.

A game can start once two people recognize each other to be in opposite roles, e.g. a Rescuer and a Victim. A set of predictable interactions follows, after which one person switches roles, say the Victim switches into Persecutor mode and the Rescuer follows the switch and becomes the Victim (possibly also a Persecutor). The switch in the game can be from any of the three positions to a different one. Just as with specific roles, people will also have a preferred point to switch to.

Let's go with an example. Not long ago, an associate described to me one of her colleagues, a person who seemed to have everybody running round to get things right for him. He would turn up late, or lose his glasses, or not get things right in some other way. He'd present himself as a Victim and then start recruiting other people's help (Rescuers) to sort things out for him. He would get other people to do phone calls for him or look for his glasses or take over his cases when he was late. There would be a number of exchanges on this level, and then he would switch into being a Persecutor. He would tell people off for not getting it right for him, or being useless in some way. That meant that the original Rescuers would become the Victims and end up feeling "kicked" or angry. The original Victim, now being the Persecutor, would also end up feeling a familiar bad feeling. He could justify his anger at the world, other people and his workplace, which he really didn't like. This particular game would get repeated again and again with the same outcomes.

As you can see, both Rescuer and Victim start off from inauthentic positions and go through a set of unconscious (or sometimes conscious) interactions which end in a switch of roles and familiar bad feelings all way round. People - maybe including you! - can repeat this pattern endlessly.

Why do people do this? There are many reasons why people play these types of games. One is that it justifies one's outlook on the world (the original Victim in the above example will feel confirmed in his belief that the world is a bad place and he can be angry with it). It is also a way of not taking responsibility for changing anything about one's situation (for example, the guy described above could get himself another job instead of taking his frustration out on his colleagues).

Another reason why people play games is that they constitute attention. Games can be emotionally highly charged and despite the fact that they produce negative attention, this can be better than no attention at all. Not playing games might leave people feeling their loneliness and disconnection from others. (The Victim/Persecutor in the above example may not have any friends or family and manages to get some interaction with others through playing games.)

If one looks at it like that, one could say a game is a failed attempt to be close to people. The participants want to be close and authentic with each other, but don't quite manage the risks of being open and honest and instead go for a slightly more predictable relationship pattern, a game (see also time structuring). Although games leave us feeling bad, they are still structured according to predictable lines: the same thing happens again and again, which is much less frightening than going for the all-out unknown of being really close to someone. If I choose to be close to another human being, all structure goes, there is just you and me relating to each other, and anything may happen! For some people that's a very frightening thing, so they divert their energy into games instead.

A game can also be a way of confirming set roles in a relationship, or staying within a symbiosis pattern. Within intimate relationships, games are often played at high intensity and we distinguish between first, second and third degree games. First degree games are at an intensity which is socially acceptable, like at work. Second degree games are more intense and are normally played behind closed doors (you may be able to hear your neighbors screaming at each other through the walls, but they wouldn't do that openly on the streets). Third degree games involve lasting damage, like physical attacks or someone getting hurt in some other way (e.g. alcoholism), or someone going to prison or dying.

What's the solution? First of all, think about the roles involved in games. Which one do you normally get into? From that, can you remember getting into a game with someone? How did it happen and what did you say to yourself afterwards? What's your preferred position to switch to? Once you know what is going on it will be easier for you to spot it sooner. Despite being conscious of what is going on, you might still feel as if you're drawn into games. However, there are always two people (or more) involved in playing a game so you will always be contributing something to keeping it going. Remember, when you are authentic you do not conform any more to the hidden agenda of the game, so being real and congruent is one way out.

The other one is to own the good qualities of the role you tend to take, but not to act it out in some way. As a Rescuer you need to allow yourself to be resourceful. You can be available to people, but not give more than you want. Remember, don't rescue people, if you don't want to persecute them in some way afterwards! They will just have to do with less support from you and do something else to fill in the gap (develop their own strengths, ask other people, and so on). As a Victim you need to own your own vulnerability, but also your responsibility to arrange yourself and your own life in a way that's comfortable to you. It's your life after all. Do something about it and don't expect others to fill the gaps. If you tend to go into Persecutor mode, your job is to own your own power and potency, but not make other people pay for it. It's ok for you to be strong.
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Re: Psychological Games

Post by cool66616 on Tue Sep 14, 2010 7:47 pm

cool66616 wrote:Despite the promising name, psychological games are really no fun at all. They are unconscious, repetitive behavior patterns between two people (sometimes more), which will leave both of them feeling depleted and unhappy.

In transactional analysis we have quite specific patterns in mind when we talk about psychological games, or just games for short. One way of defining a game is as a set of matching interactions by two or more people where there is a hidden agenda at work and at some point a switch of roles between the participants. A game ends in a predictable way and may be played over and over again.

Generally speaking, there are only 3 roles from which one can participate in a game: Rescuer, Persecutor and Victim. To show that these are roles we spell them with capital letters, to distinguish them from "real-life" rescuers such as an ambulance crew. While they rescue people, they may not be doing so from a psychological role of "rescuing". If you find this terminology odd or even inappropriate, well, it's fairly old and Eric Berne's language was simply never updated. Hope that counts as an apology.


So, we have three psychological roles, and once you take any one of them, you set yourself up to participate in a game. (As you'll see, though, it's best never to get into any of them!) People will have their favorite game position, which they start off from. Often our favorite position is something we have learned as a child. All three positions are inauthentic and dismiss some aspects about oneself or someone else (e.g. as a Rescuer I dismiss other people's capacity to think and act on their own behalf).

The Rescuer is a person who comes in with the overt agenda of doing things for other people or sorting them out in some way. The hidden belief is that other people are not capable of doing stuff for themselves, which puts the Rescuer in a "one-up" position. However, the hidden assumption is often unconscious and a lot of Rescuers are well-meaning. Even so, classic Rescuers go in to help people without asking, doing more than their fair share, and ending up doing things they don't want to do.

The Victim is a person who asks other people to sort things out for him or her rather than doing it him- or herself: in other words, operating from a "one-down" position. Victims may put themselves down and disown their capacity to think and act for themselves. They may not use their own Adult capacity to think and may believe that "I cannot cope on my own". The Victim may portray him- or herself as powerless, and often feels powerless on the inside; however, even though Victims disown their own power, they have the power to initiate the switch of roles within a game (which gives them a lot of power in relationships).

Lastly, the Persecutor. He or she dismisses the capacity of others to think, feel or act on their own behalf. The Persecutor has a hidden agenda of punishing or belittling people in some way. Like the Rescuer, he or she comes from a one-up position.

A game can start once two people recognize each other to be in opposite roles, e.g. a Rescuer and a Victim. A set of predictable interactions follows, after which one person switches roles, say the Victim switches into Persecutor mode and the Rescuer follows the switch and becomes the Victim (possibly also a Persecutor). The switch in the game can be from any of the three positions to a different one. Just as with specific roles, people will also have a preferred point to switch to.

Let's go with an example. Not long ago, an associate described to me one of her colleagues, a person who seemed to have everybody running round to get things right for him. He would turn up late, or lose his glasses, or not get things right in some other way. He'd present himself as a Victim and then start recruiting other people's help (Rescuers) to sort things out for him. He would get other people to do phone calls for him or look for his glasses or take over his cases when he was late. There would be a number of exchanges on this level, and then he would switch into being a Persecutor. He would tell people off for not getting it right for him, or being useless in some way. That meant that the original Rescuers would become the Victims and end up feeling "kicked" or angry. The original Victim, now being the Persecutor, would also end up feeling a familiar bad feeling. He could justify his anger at the world, other people and his workplace, which he really didn't like. This particular game would get repeated again and again with the same outcomes.

As you can see, both Rescuer and Victim start off from inauthentic positions and go through a set of unconscious (or sometimes conscious) interactions which end in a switch of roles and familiar bad feelings all way round. People - maybe including you! - can repeat this pattern endlessly.

Why do people do this? There are many reasons why people play these types of games. One is that it justifies one's outlook on the world (the original Victim in the above example will feel confirmed in his belief that the world is a bad place and he can be angry with it). It is also a way of not taking responsibility for changing anything about one's situation (for example, the guy described above could get himself another job instead of taking his frustration out on his colleagues).

Another reason why people play games is that they constitute attention. Games can be emotionally highly charged and despite the fact that they produce negative attention, this can be better than no attention at all. Not playing games might leave people feeling their loneliness and disconnection from others. (The Victim/Persecutor in the above example may not have any friends or family and manages to get some interaction with others through playing games.)

If one looks at it like that, one could say a game is a failed attempt to be close to people. The participants want to be close and authentic with each other, but don't quite manage the risks of being open and honest and instead go for a slightly more predictable relationship pattern, a game (see also time structuring). Although games leave us feeling bad, they are still structured according to predictable lines: the same thing happens again and again, which is much less frightening than going for the all-out unknown of being really close to someone. If I choose to be close to another human being, all structure goes, there is just you and me relating to each other, and anything may happen! For some people that's a very frightening thing, so they divert their energy into games instead.

A game can also be a way of confirming set roles in a relationship, or staying within a symbiosis pattern. Within intimate relationships, games are often played at high intensity and we distinguish between first, second and third degree games. First degree games are at an intensity which is socially acceptable, like at work. Second degree games are more intense and are normally played behind closed doors (you may be able to hear your neighbors screaming at each other through the walls, but they wouldn't do that openly on the streets). Third degree games involve lasting damage, like physical attacks or someone getting hurt in some other way (e.g. alcoholism), or someone going to prison or dying.

What's the solution? First of all, think about the roles involved in games. Which one do you normally get into? From that, can you remember getting into a game with someone? How did it happen and what did you say to yourself afterwards? What's your preferred position to switch to? Once you know what is going on it will be easier for you to spot it sooner. Despite being conscious of what is going on, you might still feel as if you're drawn into games. However, there are always two people (or more) involved in playing a game so you will always be contributing something to keeping it going. Remember, when you are authentic you do not conform any more to the hidden agenda of the game, so being real and congruent is one way out.

The other one is to own the good qualities of the role you tend to take, but not to act it out in some way. As a Rescuer you need to allow yourself to be resourceful. You can be available to people, but not give more than you want. Remember, don't rescue people, if you don't want to persecute them in some way afterwards! They will just have to do with less support from you and do something else to fill in the gap (develop their own strengths, ask other people, and so on). As a Victim you need to own your own vulnerability, but also your responsibility to arrange yourself and your own life in a way that's comfortable to you. It's your life after all. Do something about it and don't expect others to fill the gaps. If you tend to go into Persecutor mode, your job is to own your own power and potency, but not make other people pay for it. It's ok for you to be strong.


Psychological Games

Psychological Mind Games -- Serious Business, Serious Players

Psychological mind games are habitual patterns and methods of structuring time and obtaining Strokes.

Games are interpersonal time structuring options sandwiched in between the safer, more superficial option of engaging in Pasttimes and the riskier, more candid option of authentic Intimacy.

Psychological games were first identified and cataloged by Eric Berne M.D., founder of Transactional Analysis in his classic book from the mid 1960's Games People Play.

Berne defined a "Game" as: A patterned and predictable series of transactions which are superficially plausible but actually conceal motivations and lead to a well-defined predictable outcome.
Subconscious Repetitive Programs or Patterns of Behavior

These psychological mind games are habitual [neural networked] programs of behavior that exist in the implicit memory and run subconsciously - beneath the awareness of even the initiator of the game.

In other words, we don't intentionally engage in these games... In fact, many of us have expressed and/or heard this friendly warning early in a relationship..."I don't play games".

It's not a good thing to have a reputation as a "player" or a "tease". But since healthy intimacy, 24/7, with everyone we know is not possible in our society we have little choice but to engage in various games.

These psychological mind games are not played for fun...They are dysfunctional subconscious programs that have been created by our Little Professor in order to adapt to the dysfunction of our family and obtain strokes -- even negative strokes are better than no strokes at all.

The games we play are also, at least partly, the result of the role-modeling of our parents. When we watch them play certain games over and over again we develop the network for that program (Intensity and Repetition). They become part of our Love Map.

Many times our parents (subconsciously) even teach us the rules and how to play the games. These teachings are apparent in the Injunctions and Attributions we carry within us throughout life.

Even though many psychological mind games can be harmful, there is always a secondary gain or "payoff" for playing -- also known as a positive intention in Parts Integration Therapy. Here is a partial list of possible Payoffs...

* To structure time
* To obtain strokes -- either negative or positive attention
* To protect one from experiences that are believed to cause pain -- e.g., trusting others or risking intimacy
* To maintain belief systems in a steady-state
* To maintain the experience of familiar emotional themes -- e.g., a steady-state of abandonment, shame, & contempt
* To confirm and maintain an Existential or Psychological Position -- e.g., "I'm not ok...you're ok"
* To block intimacy while receiving enough strokes to "get by" -- it takes a LOT more negative strokes to get by than positive ones.
* To make life and other people predictable

Angular & Duplex Complimentary Transactions

Psychological Mind Games Psychological mind games are played on two levels...the social level (represented by the solid lines) and the psychological level (represented by the dotted lines).

With games, more than two ego states are involved in two complimentary transactions occurring simultaneously...one on a conscious (social) level the other on a subconscious (psychological) level.

* Duplex Transactions involve four ego states. (Diagram - Right)

* Angular Transactions involve three ego states. (Diagram - Below)

On the social level everything appears to be above board, honest Adult-to-Adult communication... but on the psychological level a subconscious program stored in implicit memory is sending a hidden message.

The hidden message is the invitation... or "bait"... from a Child Ego State designed to "hook" a perceived limitation in a Parent or Child Ego State of the receiver of the message.
Key Point: "It takes two to tango"... The partner we choose must know how to play the games we play.

Perceived limitations are identified and "cataloged" through subconscious perception in the partner or mate selection process -- what I call the subconscious synchronization of compatible neural networks.

So, on a conscious level Person A... the initiator... appears to be sending a socially acceptable message -- while on a subconscious level a game is being played.

When the receiver -- Person B -- responds by taking the bait there is a "switch" in ego states by Person A who gets a surprise feeling or experience (the payoff).
Angular transactions are consciously employed by tele-marketers, bill collectors, and door-to-door salesman in order to get the sale or collect the money (payoff). This is probably where the phrase... "What's your angle?" came from. Perhaps the following will illustrate...

* Salesman A - Social or conscious Level... "I think this is the best model, but you probably can't afford it". (Verbal message from Adult-to-Adult)

Psychological or subconscious level..."It's not for you". (Non-verbal para-message from Adult-to-Child)

* Customer B - Social or conscious Level... "I'll take it." (Verbal message from Adult-to-Adult)

Psychological or subconscious level..."I'll show you! I'm as good as anyone else!" (Non-verbal para-message from Child-to-Adult)

Duplex transactions, those involving four ego states, are the psychological mind games that we are concerned with here... They are played by innocent people on a subconscious, or mostly subconscious level.

Let's take the following example to show how games are passed on from parent to child...(Diagram - Below)

Context: Billy's mother sat in the living room, talking on the phone with a friend... Suddenly there was a loud crash in the next room... upon entering the room Billy's mother found the cookie jar had been knocked off the table and onto the floor -- Billy was standing next to it.

* Mother (M) - Social or conscious Level... "Who did that?". (Verbal inquiry from Adult-in-the-Adult to the Adult-in-the-Child -- aka Little Professor)

Psychological or subconscious level... Mother knew that Billy broke the jar and she discounted that she should have child-proofed the room... Her social "fact-finding" question was a subconscious invitation for Billy to lie.

* Billy (B) - Social or conscious level..."Sissy did it".

Psychological or subconscious level... Having been witness to mother's anger before, Billy's Little Professor creatively came up with a way out...except for one thing, Sissy had left the house with her father to run errands 30 minutes earlier.

* Mother (M) - Social or conscious Level... Slaps Billy and yells..."I can't stand a liar!". (Switch from Adult to Adapted Child -- specifically the Critical Parent ego state to Billy's Vulnerable Child)

Psychological or subconscious level... Mother's payoff was a surprise feeling of righteous anger that confirmed her strongly held belief that "males cannot be trusted"(M).

When her anger had passed the game was over... When she was able to re-activate her Adult and Parent ego states, she felt terrible for "over-reacting".

In the above example mother was playing a Persecutor game called "Now I've Got You, You SOB!"(M) and Billy was learning a Victim game called "Kick Me"(B).

All Billy had to do was say "I did it" and his mother couldn't play her game. But the Little Professor goes on instinct since it does not yet have the wisdom of experience... the instinct for self-preservation says "stay out of harms way".

Key Point: The sudden shift in ego states by mother provides intensity which, combined with the repetition of playing the game over and over again, will burn the game instructions into a neural network that Billy will likely carry with him into his adult relationships and mate selection process.

In other words, Billy may subconsciously search out and find a partner who knows how to play "Now I've Got You, You SOB!" so he can continue to play the "Kick Me" game. It's in the courtship phase that the subconscious auditions are done -- with the use of subconscious perception.

Psychological mind games fit easily into the framework of the Drama Triangle and always include a Victim, Rescuer, and/or Persecutor. They may be played with mild, moderate or severe intensity.
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Re: Psychological Games

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