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UFC FUEL TV Results

Fri May 25, 2012 3:08 pm by Anonymous

UFC FUEL TV Results


Fighters
Str
TD
Sub
Pass
Method
Rnd
Time
Replay
WINChan Sung Jung
Dustin Poirier
74
56
4
0
3
0
3
1
R4
Submission 4 of 5 00:01:07 --
WINAmir Sadollah
Jorge Lopez
36
32
1
4
1
0
0
2
R3
Decision - Split 3 of 3 00:05:00 --
WINDonald Cerrone
Jeremy Stephens
87
46
1
0
0
0
0


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As a woman...about the UFC who i want to win

Fri May 25, 2012 3:18 pm by Anonymous

[b]As a woman...about the UFC who i want to win

Stefan-Struve OMG he is sooo cute....yes my female hormones pick the fighter!!


Skill Breakdown
Charts are compiled based on results from all fights.
Total Fights: 11
Record: 27-5-0
Summary: kickboxing and submissions
Fighter Info
Nickname: Skyscraper


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Short history of the UFC

Fri May 25, 2012 2:57 pm by Anonymous

What is MMA and the UFC?

Originating from the full contact sport of Vale tudo in Brazil, the UFC was created in the United States in 1993 with minimal rules, and was promoted as a competition to determine the most effective marital art for unarmed combat situations.

It wasn't long before the …


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Demonology

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Demonology

Post by cool66616 on Fri Jun 25, 2010 4:32 am

Demonology is the systematic study of demons or beliefs about demons.[1] Insofar as it involves exegesis, demonology is an orthodox branch of theology.[2] It is the branch of theology relating to superhuman beings who are not gods.[3] It deals both with benevolent beings that have no circle of worshippers or so limited a circle as to be below the rank of gods, and with malevolent beings of all kinds. The original sense of "demon," from the time of Homer onward, was a benevolent being;[4] but in English the name now holds connotations of malevolence.

Demons, when regarded as spirits, may belong to either of the classes of spirits recognized by primitive animism;[5] that is to say, they may be human, or non-human, separable souls, or discarnate spirits which have never inhabited a body. A sharp distinction is often drawn between these two classes, notably by the Melanesians, the West Africans, and others; the Arab djinn, for example, are not reducible to modified human souls; at the same time these classes are frequently conceived as producing identical results, e.g. diseases.[3][4] Demonology, though often referred to with negative connotation, was not always seen as evil or devilish as the term would have one believe.
[b]
Prevalence of demons
"Nightmare", 1800, by Nikolaj Abraham Abildgaard

According to some societies, all the affairs of life are supposed to be under the control of spirits, each ruling a certain "element" or even object, and themselves in subjection to a greater spirit.[7] For example, the Inuit are said to believe in spirits of the sea, earth and sky, the winds, the clouds and everything in nature. Every cove of the seashore, every point, every island and prominent rock has its guardian spirit. All are potentially of the malignant type, to be propitiated by an appeal to knowledge of the supernatural.[8] Traditional Korean belief posits that countless demons inhabit the natural world; they fill household objects and are present in all locations. By the thousands they accompany travelers, seeking them out from their places in the elements.[9]

In ancient Babylon, demonology had an influence on even the most mundane elements of life, from petty annoyances to the emotions of love and hatred. The numerous demonic spirits were given charge over various parts of the human body, one for the head, one for the neck, and so on.

Greek philosophers such as Porphyry, who claimed influence from Platonism,[10] and the fathers of the Christian Church, held that the world was pervaded with spirits,[9] the latter of whom advanced the belief that demons received the worship directed at pagan gods.[11]

Many religions and cultures believe, or once believed, that what is now known as sleep paralysis, was a form of physical contact with demons.
Character of the spiritual world

The ascription of malevolence to the world of spirits is by no means universal. In West Africa, the Mpongwe believe in local spirits, just as do the Inuit; but they are regarded as inoffensive in the main. Passers-by must make some trifling offering as they near the spirits' place of abode; but it is only occasionally that mischievous acts, such as the throwing down of a tree on a passer-by, are, in the view of the natives, perpetuated by the class of spirits known as Ombuiri.[12] So too, many of the spirits especially concerned with the operations of nature are conceived as neutral or even benevolent; the European peasant fears the corn-spirit only when he irritates him by trenching on his domain and taking his property by cutting the corn;[13] similarly, there is no reason why the more insignificant personages of the pantheon should be conceived as malevolent, and we find that the Petara of the Dyaks are far from indiscriminating and malignant, being viewed as invisible guardians of mankind.[14]

The Devil (Greek: διάβολος or diávolos = 'slanderer' or 'accuser'[1]) is believed in certain religions and cultures to be a powerful, supernatural entity that is the personification of evil and the enemy of God and humankind. The Devil is commonly associated with heretics, infidels, and other unbelievers. The Abrahamic religions have variously regarded the Devil as a rebellious fallen angel or demon that tempts humans to sin or commit evil deeds. Others regard the Devil as an allegory that represents a crisis of faith, individualism, free will, wisdom and enlightenment.

In mainstream Christianity, God and the Devil are usually portrayed as fighting over the souls of humans, with the Devil seeking to lure people away from God and into Hell. The Devil commands a force of evil angels, commonly known as demons.[2] The Hebrew Bible (or Old Testament) describes the Adversary (Ha-satan) as an angel who instigates tests upon humankind.[3][4] Many other religions have a trickster or tempter figure that is similar to the Devil. Modern conceptions of the Devil include the concept that it symbolizes humans' own lower nature or sinfulness.

People put the concept of the Devil to use in social and political conflicts, claiming that their opponents are influenced by the Devil or even willingly supporting the Devil. The Devil has also been used to explain why others hold beliefs that are considered to be false and ungodly.
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Re: Demonology

Post by cool66616 on Fri Jun 25, 2010 4:44 am

The List OF Theological Demons :



* Aamon or Amon (Christian demonology)
* Abaddon (Christian demonology)
* Abalam (Christian demonology)
* Abezethibou (Testament of Solomon)
* Abraxas (Gnosticism)
* Abyzou (Jewish mythology)
* Ad-Dajjal (a.k.a. Dajjal) (Islamic eschatology)
* Adramelech (Assyrian mythology)
* Aeshma (Zoroastrianism)
* Agaliarept (Jewish mythology)
* Agares (Christian demonology)
* Agiel (Jewish mythology)
* Ahriman/Angra Mainyu (Zoroastrianism)
* Aim (Christian demonology)
* Akem Manah/Akoman/Akvan (Zoroastrianism)
* Ala (Slavic mythology)
* Alal (Chaldean mythology)
* Alastor (Christian demonology)
* Alloces (Christian demonology)
* Allu (Akkadian mythology)
* Amaymon (Christian demonology)
* Amdusias (Christian demonology)
* Ammut (Egyptian mythology)
* Anamalech (Assyrian mythology)
* Anzu (Sumerian mythology)
* Amon (Christian demonology)
* Amy (Christian demonology)
* Andhaka (Hindu mythology)
* Andras (Christian demonology)
* Andrealphus (Christian demonology)
* Andromalius (Christian demonology)
* Antichrist (Christian demonology)
* Apep (a.k.a. Apophis) (Egyptian mythology)
* Apollyon (Christian demonology)
* Armaros (Christian demonology)
* Asag (Sumerian mythology)
* Asb'el (Jewish mythology)
* Asmodai/Asmodeus (Jewish folklore and Christian demonology)
* Astaroth (Christian demonology)
* Astarte (Semitic mythology)
* Asura (Hindu mythology)
* Azazel (Jewish demonology) and (Islamic mythology)
* Azi Dahaka/Dahak (Zoroastrianism)

[edit] B

* Baal (Christian demonology)
* Balam (Christian demonology)
* Balberith (Jewish demonology)
* Bali Raj (Hindu mythology)
* Banshee (Irish mythology)
* Baphomet (Demon, or image/idol thereof)
* Barbas (Christian demonology)
* Barbatos (Christian demonology)
* Bathin (Christian demonology)
* Beelzebub (Jewish demonology, Christian demonology)
* Behemoth (Jewish demonology)
* Beherit (Phoenician mythology)
* Belial (Jewish demonology, Christian demonology)
* Beleth (Christian demonology)
* Belphegor (Christian demonology)
* Berith (Christian demonology)
* Bhūta (Sanskrit)
* Bies (Slavic Mythology)
* Bifrons (Christian demonology)
* Boruta (Slavic mythology)
* Botis (Christian demonology)
* Buer (Christian demonology)
* Bukavac (Slavic mythology)
* Bune (Christian demonology)
* Bushyasta (Zoroastrianism)

[edit] C

* Caacrinolaas (Christian demonology)
* Caim (Christian demonology)
* Charun (Etruscan mythology)
* Chemosh (Moabite mythology)
* Cimejes (Christian demonology)
* Corson (Christian demonology)
* Crocell (Christian demonology)
* Crone (Christian demonology)
* Culsu (Etruscan mythology)

[edit] D

* Daeva (Zoroastrianism demonology)
* Dagon (Semitic mythology)
* Dantalion (Christian demonology)
* Danjal (Jewish mythology)
* Dasa (Hindu mythology)
* Davy Jones (sailor lore)
* Decarabia (Christian demonology)
* Demogorgon (Christian demonology)
* Devil (Christian demonology)
* Div-e Sepid (Persian mythology)
* Donn (Irish mythology)
* Drekavac (Slavic mythology)
* Dzoavits (Native American mythology)

[edit] E

* Eligos (Christian demonology)
* Empusa (Greek mythology)
* Euryale (Greek mythology)
* Eurynome (Greek mythology)
* Eurynomos (Greek mythology)

[edit] F

* Familiars (Christian demonology)
* Focalor (Christian demonology)
* Foras (Christian demonology)
* Forneus (Christian demonology)
* Furies (Roman mythology)
* Furcas (Christian demonology)
* Furfur (Christian demonology)

[edit] G

* Gader'el (Jewish demonology)
* Gaki (Japanese mythology)
* Gello (Greek mythology, Christian demonology)
* Glasya-Labolas (Christian demonology)
* Gorgon (Greek mythology)
* Gremory (Christian demonology)
* Grigori (Jewish demonology)
* Gualichu (Mapuche mythology)
* Gusion (Christian demonology)

[edit] H

* Haagenti (Christian demonology)
* Halphas (Christian demonology)
* Haures (Christian demonology)
* Humbaba (Sumerian mythology, Akkadian mythology)

[edit] I

* Ifrit (Islamic mythology)
* Incubus (Christian demonology, Chaldean mythology, Jewish folklore)
* Ipos (Christian demonology)
* Iblis (Islamic mythology)

[edit] J

* Jinn, or Djinn (Islamic mythology)
* Jikininki (Japanese mythology)
* Joseph (demon) (Jewish mythology)

[edit] K

* Kabandha (Hinduism)
* Kitsune (Japanese mythology)
* Kokb'ael (Jewish demonology)

[edit] L

* Labal (Christian demonology)
* Lady Midday (Slavic Mythology)
* Lamashtu (Sumerian mythology)
* Lamia (Bulgarian folklore, Christian demonology and Greek mythology)
* Legion (Christian demonology)
* Lechies (Slavic mythology)
* Leyak (Indonesian mythology)
* Lempo (Finnish mythology)
* Leraje (Christian demonology)
* Leviathan (Christian demonology, Jewish demonology)
* Lilim (Jewish demonology, Christian demonology, Lilimist Occult)
* Lilith (Sumerian mythology, Akkadian mythology, Jewish folklore)
* Lilin (Jewish demonology)
* Lix Tetrax (Jewish/Christian demonology)
* Lucifer (Christian demonology)
* Lucifuge Rofocale (Christian demonology)

[edit] M

* Malphas (Christian demonology)
* Mammon (Christian demonology)
* Mara (Buddhist mythology, Scandinavian folklore)
* Maricha (Hindu mythology)
* Marax (Christian demonology)
* Marbas (Christian demonology)
* Marchosias (Christian demonology)
* Mastema (Jewish demonology)
* Mathim (Christian demonology)
* Medusa (Greek mythology)
* Mephistopheles (Christian folklore)
* Merihem (Christian demonology)
* Mictlantecuhtli (Aztec mythology)
* Moloch (Christian demonology)
* Murmur (Christian demonology)

[edit] N

* Naamah (Jewish demonology)
* Naberius (Christian demonology)
* Naberus (Christian demonology)
* Naphula (Christian demonology)
* Nekomata (Japanese mythology)
* Neqa'el (Egyptian mythology)
* Ninurta (Sumerian mythology, Akkadian mythology)
* Nisroch (Christian demonology)
* Nix (North-European folklore)
* Nyai Loro Kidul (a.k.a. Nyi Roro Kidul) (Javanese mythology)

[edit] O

* Obizoth (Christian demonology)
* Onoskelis (Greek mythology)
* Oray (Christian demonology)
* Orcus (Roman mythology)
* Oriax (Christian demonology)
* Orobas (Christian demonology)
* Ose (Christian demonology)
* Oni (Japanese demonology)

[edit] P

* Paimon (Christian demonology)
* Pazuzu (Sumerian mythology, Akkadian mythology)
* Penemue (Jewish mythology)
* Phenex (Christian demonology)
* Pithius (Christian demonology)
* Pocong (Melayu, Indonesian demonology)
* Pontianak (a.k.a. Kuntilanak) (Indonesian demonology)
* Popobawa (Zanzibar demonology)
* Procell (Christian demonology)
* Pruflas (Christian demonology)
* Psoglav (Slavic Mythology)
* Purson (Christian demonology)
* Putana (Hindu mythology)

[edit] Q
[edit] R

* Rahab (Jewish folklore)
* Rahovart (European folklore)
* Raiju (Japanese mythology)
* Rakshasa (Hindu mythology)
* Rangda (Balinese mythology)
* Raum (Christian demonology)
* Ravana (Hindu mythology - also seen by some Hindus as an aspect of the God Shiva)
* Ronove (Christian demonology)
* Rosier (Christian demonology)
* Rumjal (Jewish demonology)
* Rusalka (Slavic mythology)

[edit] S

* Sabnock (Christian demonology)
* Sallos (Christian demonology)
* Salpsan, Satan's son (Apocryphal Gospel of Bartholomew)
* Samael (Jewish demonology)
* Satan (Jewish demonology, Christian demonology, Islamic mythology)
* Satanachia (Christian demonology)
* Scox (Christian demonology)
* Seere (Christian demonology)
* Semyazza (Jewish demonology)
* Set (Egyptian mythology during the Second Intermediate Period)
* Shaitan (Islamic mythology)
* Shax (Christian demonology)
* Shedim (Jewish folklore)
* Shezmu (Egyptian mythology)
* Sidragasum (Christian demonology)
* Sitri (Christian demonology)
* Stheno (Greek mythology)
* Stolas (Christian demonology)
* Stuhać (Slavic Mythology)
* Succubus (Sumerian mythology, Akkadian mythology, Jewish folklore, Christian demonology)
* Surgat (Christian demonology)

[edit] T

* Tannin (Jewish demonology)
* Tartaruchi (Apocryphal Christian demonology)
* Temeluchus (Apocryphal Christian demonology)
* Teeraal (Babylonian mythology)
* Tengu (Japanese mythology)
* Titivillus (Christian demonology)
* Tuyul (Indonesian mythology)

[edit] U

* Ukobach (Christian demonology)
* Utukku (Akkadian mythology - but could be good or evil in Sumerian mythology)

[edit] V

* Valefar (Christian demonology)
* Vapula (Christian demonology)
* Vassago (Christian demonology)
* Vepar (Christian demonology)
* Verrine (Christian demonology)
* Vine (Christian demonology)
* Volac (Christian demonology)
* Vual (Christian demonology)
* Vucub Caquix (Mayan mythology)

[edit] W

* Wekufe (Mapuche Mythology)
* Wendigo (Native American Mythology)

[edit] X

* Xaphan (Christian demonology)

[edit] Y

* Yeqon (Jewish demonology)
* Yeter'el (Christian demonology)
* Yokai (Japanese folklore)
* Yuki-Onna (Japanese folklore)

[edit] Z

* Zaebos (Christian demonology)
* Zagan (Christian demonology)
* Zalambur (Islamic mythology)
* Zepar (Christian demonology)
* Zmeu (Romanian folklore)
* Zin (West African folklore)
* Ziz (Jewish Demonology)

[edit]
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Re: Demonology

Post by cool66616 on Fri Jun 25, 2010 4:51 am

The Devil (Greek: διάβολος or diávolos = 'slanderer' or 'accuser'[1]) is believed in certain religions and cultures to be a powerful, supernatural entity that is the personification of evil and the enemy of God and humankind. The Devil is commonly associated with heretics, infidels, and other unbelievers. The Abrahamic religions have variously regarded the Devil as a rebellious fallen angel or demon that tempts humans to sin or commit evil deeds. Others regard the Devil as an allegory that represents a crisis of faith, individualism, free will, wisdom and enlightenment.

In mainstream Christianity, God and the Devil are usually portrayed as fighting over the souls of humans, with the Devil seeking to lure people away from God and into Hell. The Devil commands a force of evil angels, commonly known as demons.[2] The Hebrew Bible (or Old Testament) describes the Adversary (Ha-satan) as an angel who instigates tests upon humankind.[3][4] Many other religions have a trickster or tempter figure that is similar to the Devil. Modern conceptions of the Devil include the concept that it symbolizes humans' own lower nature or sinfulness.

People put the concept of the Devil to use in social and political conflicts, claiming that their opponents are influenced by the Devil or even willingly supporting the Devil. The Devil has also been used to explain why others hold beliefs that are considered to be false and ungodly.
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Re: Demonology

Post by cool66616 on Fri Jun 25, 2010 4:56 am

Hinduism

In contrast to Christianity, Islam, and Zoroastrianism, Hinduism does not recognize any central evil force or entity such as the Devil opposing God. Hinduism does recognize that different beings (e.g., asuras) and entities can perform evil acts, under the temporary dominance of the guna of tamas, and cause wordly sufferings. The Rajasic and Tamasic Gunas of Maya are considered especially close to the Abrahamic concept , the hellish parts of the Ultimate Delusion called "Prakriti". An embodiment of this is the concept of Advaita (non-dualism) where there is no good or evil but simply different levels of realization.
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Re: Demonology

Post by cool66616 on Fri Jun 25, 2010 4:57 am

Buddhism
Main article: Mara (demon)

A devil-like figure in Buddhism is Mara. He is a tempter, who also tempted Gautama Buddha by trying to seduce him with the vision of beautiful women who, in various legends, are often said to be Mara's daughters. Mara personifies unskillfulness, the "death" of the spiritual life. He tries to distract humans from practicing the spiritual life by making the mundane alluring or the negative seem positive. Another interpretation of Mara is that he is the desires that are present in ones own mind preventing the person from seeing the truth. So in a sense Mara is not an independent being but a part of one's own being that has to be defeated. In daily life of the Buddha the role of devil has been given to Devadatta.
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Re: Demonology

Post by cool66616 on Fri Jun 25, 2010 4:57 am

Ancient Egypt
Main articles: Set (mythology) and Apep

In the Ausarian drama we find that Ausar (Greek: Osiris) is chopped into 13 pieces by Set. Auset (Isis) collects all of his pieces save his phallus. Horus, son of Ausar and Auset sets out to avenge the death and dismemberment of his father by confronting Set. Horus is victorious over Set and Ausar, being brought back from the dead becomes lord of the underworld. It is this drama that gives us the cosmic conflict between good and evil, evil being embodied by Set. This is not to say that Set was always seen as an evil character in Ancient Egyptian theology. There are many times in Ancient Egyptian history where conflicts between different "houses" lead to the depreciation of one god relative to another.

As in most polytheistic faiths, the characters involved differentiate themselves from the Western tradition of a devil in that all the gods are closely related. In this case, numerous historic texts suggest that Set is the Uncle or Brother of Horus and in the "defeat" of Set, we see another separation from the norm in the devouring/assimilation of Set into Horus with the result of Horus having depictions of both the falcon head and the (unknown animal) head of Set. This (like Buddhism) represents a dissolution of dichotomy.
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Re: Demonology

Post by cool66616 on Fri Jun 25, 2010 4:58 am

World folklore
Depiction of the Devil interviewing Mayor Hall

In the Western Christian tradition, the Devil has entered popular folklore, particularly in his role as a trickster figure. As such, he is found as a character in a wide number of traditional folktales and legends from Ireland, Newfoundland, Italy and the United Kingdom, where he often attempts to trick or outwit other characters. In some of these tales, the Devil is portrayed as more of a folk villain than as the personification of evil. The Devil also features prominently in a number of hagiographical tales, or tales of the saints such as the popular tale of St. Dunstan, many of which may fall outside the authorized religious canon. The Devil is also a recurring feature in tales explaining the etymology of geographical names, lending his name to natural formations such as The Devil's Chimney.
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Re: Demonology

Post by cool66616 on Fri Jun 25, 2010 4:59 am

In the Gathas, the oldest texts of the Zoroastrian Avesta, believed to have been composed by Zoroaster himself, the poet does not mention a manifest adversary. Ahura Mazda's Creation is "truth", asha. The "lie" (druj) is manifest only as decay or chaos, not an entity.

Later, in Zurvanism (Zurvanite Zoroastrianism), Ahura Mazda and the principle of evil, Angra Mainyu, are the "twin" offspring of Zurvan, 'Time'. No trace of Zurvanism exists after the 10th century.

Today, the Parsis of India largely accept the 19th century interpretation that Angra Mainyu is the 'Destructive Emanation' of Ahura Mazda. Instead of struggling against Mazda himself, Angra Mainyu battles Spenta Mainyu, Mazda's 'Creative Emanation.'
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Re: Demonology

Post by Guest on Sun Jun 27, 2010 4:55 am

wow that was a long long review of demology Shocked . Took me a while but wow i never knew some of these things. Great work man thanks for sharing really helps understand this more. keep up the good work. Smile

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